• Seven of Malaysia's most delicious local dishes

    Southeast Asia is full of countries full of delicious food. You’ve got Vietnam, with it’s promises of banh mi, pho, bun, and banh xeo, Thailand with it’s green and red curries, pad Thai, massaman curry and tom yum soup, and even the likes of Laos and Burma now making an impact on the international food circuit.

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  • Eight amazing things to do in Malaysia and Borneo


    In Malaysia, teeming cities and tropical rainforests collide to provide a veritable wonderland for travellers. Between the street food stalls of Penang and the hum of Kuala Lumpur to the otherwordly Borneo, home to Kinabalu National Park, the fascinating Gomantong Caves and the dreamy Manukan Island (oh, and Mount Kinabalu), you'll never be stuck for something to eat, do or look at.

    But with so much to take in, it can be tricky to know where to start. So here's Peregrine's pick of things to do in Malaysia and Borneo.

    1. Hang in Penang

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  • "Dad, those plants have tentacles" and other notes from a family trip through Borneo

    By Michael Robotham. First published in Escape Travel. Reproduced with permission by Michael Robotham and News Ltd.

    The brief was simple: a family holiday, somewhere unusual, somewhere memorable.

    It has to be outside Australia," said my eldest princess, a teenage travel snob. "And somewhere warm," announced the middle princess, who is 12. "Where we can ski," added the littlest princess, 9. That's why parents should never consult their offspring about anything other than whether their teeth are clean.

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  • Burma's food, history and politics: through the eyes of a local

    By Tayla Gentle
    An avid birdwatcher, rum appreciator and sometime Chinlone player, 32-year-old Peregrine leader Aye Chan Tun (affectionately known as Tun Tun) is a softly spoken enigma.


    With his signature wink and tartan longyi, you’re just as likely to find him translating Buddhist passages in the halls of a ruinous temple as teaching travellers how to say cheers (char gwa!) over a beer.

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  • Lights, camera, travel: 7 iconic film sets you should visit this year

    By James Shackell

    “There’s no place like home,” Judy Garland says in the 1939 classic The Wizard of Oz, before clicking her heels and picturing sleepy Kansas. And while these words are enshrined in cinema history, we think Dorothy might have had a different approach to travel if she’d seen a few of the movies in our list below.

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  • 5 Kokoda Track essentials (from someone who's done it)

    by Tom Beadle

  • Peregrine picks: 7 of Asia's best markets

    Image courtesy of Tartatin2009, Flickr

    There’s likely no finer place to really get to know the culture of a destination than a market. And when it comes to markets, Asia has some of the best in the world (followed closely by South and Central America!)

  • A brief history of Indochina’s French influence


    Photo courtesy of Nguyen Ngoc Chinh, Flickr

  • A guide to tackling the Kokoda Track

    There's simply nothing else like the Kokoda Track. The mountainous spine of Papua New Guinea is a fearsome environment, with swings in temperature, downpours and energy-sapping humidity. It is also a staggeringly beautiful part of the world, and one that just isn't accessible any way other than by foot.

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  • The essence of Vietnam: Tuyen Vu

    Tuyun Vu is about as passionate a Peregrine leader as you can expect to find. And over the course of the past four years, he’s made loyal friends of many of his travellers, who are blown away by his knowledge and the insight he can offer of his home country, Vietnam.

    How long have you been a Peregrine guide and how did you first get involved with Peregrine?
    I have been a Peregrine group leader for three years. I was given the opportunity to be a part of Peregrine by Mr.Long when PEAK Vietnam formed in 2010.

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